Woven Hair Textile

More photographs from the husband taken at the Bangkok Art and Culture Center in Thailand. This textile is called Trailak (The Three Characteristics of Existence), 2012. It is woven entirely of hair.

Trailak by Thanawat Muncid

The placard reads:

From his faith towards Dhamma regarding Trailak (The Three Characteristics of existence) that teaches people to consider on truth of impermanence, incompleteness and non-self. This teaching inspired the artist to weave hair that is the symbol of body or impermanence to be created as a mixed media in the form of a pagoda referred to something we should remind and pay respect at all times. The objective of this artwork is to express idea, emotion and feeling obtained from considering corpse that is the mark of death in order to refine our mind from lust and omit wickedness with the aim to do good things and reach pure heart according to Buddha’s teaching.

Trailak by Thanawat Muncid - Close-up

I am assuming that the weaver used human hair to symbolize impermanence. The pagoda is incredible, with so much detail to give it its shape and ornamentation. It is rather interesting to me how buildings such as churches, temples and other holy places can last for centuries far outliving the humans who built them.

28 thoughts on “Woven Hair Textile

    1. I thought the same thing. But then I remembered how a co-worker donated her hair to make wigs for women who lost their hair from chemo and I figured if you can do that, you can weave with it!

  1. Really neat piece of art…but things made with human hair always creep me out a bit. Even yarns that seem a little bit like hair-texture freak me out.

      1. I know what you mean. Although I’ve touched a few dog hair blankets and they’re actually very soft. Washed, you know, so no dander or saliva. Not very crispy though, so I would imagine the easiest thing would be to blend it with another fiber.

    1. Thank you Raquel. I would love to visit Thailand too. My husband says it’s beautiful and that everyone is incredibly nice. He has seen quite a bit of poverty. He indulges me by sending yarn-related photos that he knows I will appreciate.

      Congratulations on receiving the Liebster Award! Thank you for considering Agujas for this honor.

  2. Wow!! It’s SO intricate. Unbelievable craftsmanship there.

    I love the statement about the permanence of our architectural structures versus our own frailty. How true.

    And the patience of Job comes to mind…

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