Crocheting at the Long Corridor

One hazy day, we went to the Temple of Heaven Park. The air quality index was very high at 347 (hazardous) and reached a high of 477 (more hazardous) by evening. I’ve noticed that the worse the air quality, the cooler it gets, so overall it was a pleasant afternoon.

We gravitated toward a long passageway where many locals had congregated. There were countless groups of men and women playing lively games of cards.

Men Playing Cards - Long Corridor

Women Playing Cards - Long Corridor

As we continued, I was immediately drawn to a woman working with her hands. From afar I could tell she was crocheting! She had several of her handmade items for sale and even let me add a few triple crochet stitches.

Crocheting Along the Long Corridor

Crocheted Handbags - Long Corridor

The Long Corridor consists of covered passages connecting the Animal Killing Pavilion to the Divine Kitchen and the Divine Warehouse. From what I read, the night before a ceremony, the Long Corridor would be lit up with lanterns. Offerings of jade, silk, grains, and fruit would be stored there.

Beams along the Long Corridor

The Temple of Heaven is actually the name of the entire park covering 2.7 million square meters. During the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties, the emperors held worship ceremonies here.

Route to Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Detail en route to Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests is perhaps the most associated with the Temple of Heaven. Worship ceremonies were held here to pray for good weather and good harvests.

Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Inside Views - Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Water Drainage - Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

View from Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Near the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests, there is a Seventy-Year-Old Door. According to the sign, it is so named because it was built for Emperor Qianlong as a shortcut to the ceremony when he was 70 years old and in failing health. Out of concern that his sons would abuse the convenience, he decreed that only his offspring who had reached the age of 70 could use the door. No other emperor in the Qing Dynasty reached that age so he was the only person to ever use the door.

70 Year Old Door

Near the Seventy-Year Old Door.

Detail of Water Drainage - Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Annex - Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Colorful Beams - Temple of Heaven Park

Flower Detail Water Drainage - Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

The Nine Dragon Juniper is over 500 years old. The trunk is covered with grooves that resemble nine dragons twisting around the tree, hence the name.

Nine-Dragon Juniper

The next stop was the Imperial Vault of Heaven. The surrounding wall is called Echo Wall because of the acoustics.

The Imperial Vault of Heaven

Sculpted Stone - Temple of Heaven Park

Roof Detail - Imperial Vault of Heaven

The last stop was through these gates to the Circular Mound Altar, which is the actual temple of heaven as this is where the emperors sacrificed to Heaven. By then, there were many visitors and it was impossible to get a good photo of the Heavenly Center Stone.

En Route to the Circular Mound Altar

After walking the length of the park, we were ready for a nap.

21 thoughts on “Crocheting at the Long Corridor

      1. That makes perfect sense. I’m sure it gave you a better feel for the place, as those people added to your cultural experience!

  1. Wow, it looks amazing. There aren’t many countries that feel totally foreign, that have a completely foreign culture. Most are very similar really. I reckon China is one that is totally foreign. I loved India because of it, think I would like to visit China too.

  2. Gorgeous photos. I’m loving your posts about China. I lived there for a year in the early 1990s and your posts are bringing back lots of lovely memories.

    1. It has been an incredible experience so far between working with my Chinese colleagues and exploring the city. I don’t get much sleep but don’t want to miss anything!

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